Current Conference Calls For Papers

 

Please consult this resource for information on conferences you might wish to present at or attend. Deadlines for calls for proposals are listed first; conferences of interest have dates of the actual conference listed first. If you would like to submit a call for papers to be posted, please email Amy McIntyre, ASLE Managing Director.


 

Calls for Proposals

 

June 15, 2014. The Rhetoric of Waste and Sustainability. Panel proposal for the South Atlantic Modern Language Association (SAMLA) annual meeting with the theme "Sustainability and the Humanities" held in Atlanta, Georgia, November 7-9, 2014.

Is the rhetoric of waste and sustainability a validation or a critique of neoliberalism? Can we lead less wasteful and more sustainable lives in an era of smart technologies and problem-solving ideology? Can we live off the grid, save the world, and sip fair trade coffee all at the same time? Last but not least, what’s the humanistic perspective on empty signifiers such as efficiency, downsizing, outsourcing, sustainable systems, benefits-cost analysis, etc.? This panel invites papers on topics including but not limited to any critique of late capitalism, cultural analysis of community gardens, organic produce, food systems, or dumpster-diving, and teaching pedagogies dealing with eco-criticism and environmental studies.

By June 15, please submit a 300-word abstract, a brief bio, and A/V requirements to Iuliu Ratiu, Georgia Institute of Technology, at iuliu.ratiu@lmc.gatech.edu.


 

June 15, 2014. Reanimate Earth: Liminality and Communitas in Literature of the Americas. Special Session for the South Atlantic Modern Language Association (SAMLA) annual meeting in Atlanta, Georgia November 7-9, 2014.

Seeking out new growth in devastated spaces and optimism in the face of environmental despair, this panel will take on the task of enchanting readers with physical spaces in the U.S., Canada, and Latin America that have already been toxified or left for dead. The liminal, a conception traditionally most relevant to anthropology and psychoanalysis, has the capacity to reinvigorate the relationship between culture and its more anomalous literary environments.

The possibilities for this concept are substantial, particularly when we perceive the liminal self as place, because as limen the hybridized monsters and liminal zones depicted in post-WW II literature are catalysts for environmental reanimation and a source for hope. What we propose is the observance, sorting and wise use of unclassified spaces where more than reforestation and revegetation will be needed to bring back ecological viability and biodiversity; sites of interest might include areas either flooded or desertified due to global warming, zones at the edge of leaking nuclear reactors, interstate medians, tornado-ravaged areas, aesthetic greens surrounding campuses, and graveyards. 

Possible topics may include, but are not limited to, the following:
• hybrid spaces and bodies
• interstitial regions and borderlands
• transnational approaches to place
• liminality as a result of globalization
• golems, zombies, and shape-shifters
• liminal communities
• post-post-apocalyptic literature and film
• ecological dead zones
• genetically modified organisms

Send 200-500 word abstracts to Lee Rozelle at rozellehl@montevallo.edu by June 15.


 

June 15, 2014.  Comparing Ecologies: Humanism, Globalization, and Early Modern Networks of Sustainability.  Session proposal in COMPARATIVE LITERATURE (MEDIEVAL AND RENAISSANCE), SESSION II, for the South Atlantic Modern Language Association (SAMLA) annual meeting with the theme "Sustainability and the Humanities" held in Atlanta, Georgia November 7-9, 2014.

This session investigates the SAMLA 86 theme from an interdisciplinary and comparative perspective. How does our understanding of sustainability, ecology, and the environment in early modern literature and culture benefit from a broader, comparative, perspective? How far did early modern writers, humanists, and scholars understand ecological crises and environmental challenges as phenomena that cut across linguistic, cultural, and national boundaries? How far did the rise of European humanism with an increased focus on language and philology alter/enhance/dismiss the concept of nature and sustainability, especially against the backdrop of New World “discoveries”? Which literary genres are particularly sensitive to ecology and sustainability? What is the place of the “national” in a translational preoccupation such as sustainability and ecology? How can the study of early modern environmental topics complicate our understanding of the Humanities? This panel welcomes papers focusing, in particular, on the period ca. 1300-1700. By June 15, 2014, please submit a 250-word abstract, brief bio (including name, contact, and affiliation), and A/V requirements to Katharina N. Piechocki, Harvard University, at
kpiechocki@fas.harvard.edu.

Selected papers will be considered for inclusion in a book project to be published by Lexington Books’ Ecocritical Theory and Practice series.


 

June 15, 2014. Permanent Section on Native American Literature, 2014 MMLA conference.  Detroit, Michigan, November 13-16, 2014.  Ancient cities of North America include the legacy of Mound Builders such as the World Heritage Site at Cahokia and elsewhere throughout the Midwest. Across the continent–from the kivas, glyphs, and cliff dwellings of the Southwest to the rock painting of the Upper Midwest–such historical sites have served as the setting and inspiration for many Midwestern writers including novelists from Mary Austin to Louise Erdrich as well as literary naturalists Loren Eiseley, Sigurd Olson, Scott Russell Sanders, Paul Gruchow and Elizabeth Dodd. We welcome proposals for papers examining how such indigenous ruins and tracings on the landscape are represented in the literary works of authors associated with the region. What purposes do such references serve in terms of evoking cultural and environmental history?

Please send abstracts of at least 250 words for papers on related topics to Christian Knoeller by June 15th. Christian Knoeller, Purdue University, West Lafayette Indiana, knoeller@purdue.edu.


 

June 15, 2014. Eco-Imaginaries: 4th Annual Tufts Graduate Humanities Conference. Conference Date: October 10, 2014
Conference Website: http://tuftsgradhumanitiesconference.wordpress.com/

As humans, we are continually examining how to position ourselves spatially, aesthetically, emotionally, intellectually, and practically in our environments. Today, we face these tasks with new urgency as the devastating impact of global climate change stimulates renewed scholarly focus on the environment. From Ecocriticism to Posthumanism to Deep Ecology studies, the humanities are engaged in a multi-disciplinary effort to understand how humans interact with natural and built environments. This conference aims to engage with and foster discussions around the complex and historically situated ways in which we imagine and inhabit the environment.

The 2014 Tufts Graduate Humanities Conference seeks to bring together papers that attend to the ways environments are imagined, produced, and articulated in diverse contexts and mediums. Some questions to consider:
•    How have humanistic discourses responded to environmental crises, past and ongoing?
•    What are the aesthetic innovations that have helped represent the sedimented histories of colonialism, global capitalism, and histories of devastation?
•    What role do the linked histories of racism, colonialism, sexism, and militarism play in our imaginings of, and relationships to, the environment?
•    What is the role of art in depicting and understanding ongoing human and natural global devastation?
•    What role does political economy play in discourses of environmentalism?
•    How might we engage with indigenous knowledges when discussing the complex interactions between local and global, without fetishizing either?
•    How do communities—large and small—articulate their identities in more symbiotic and reciprocal ways with their environments?
•    How can we engage terms like ‘ecology,’ ‘environment,’ and ‘humanities’ in order to invite new modes of analysis and representation which more ably reflect histories of devastation, toxic activity, and violence—both human and natural?
•    How might we re-imagine and re-articulate more equitable and sustainable futures for the environment?

Eco-Imaginaries welcomes papers, from all disciplines and fields, whose work participates in emergent conversations about the environment in the humanities. Please send your abstract of no more than 300 words, along with a short bio, to tuftsgradhumanitiesconference@gmail.com by June 15, 2014.

Keynote: Elizabeth DeLoughrey is an associate professor of English and of the Institute for the Environment and Sustainability at the University of California, Los Angeles. She is co-editor of Caribbean Literature and the Environment (2005), Postcolonial Ecologies: Literatures of the Environment (2011) and Global Ecologies: Postcolonial Approaches to the Environmental Humanities (forthcoming). She is the author of Routes and Roots: Navigating Caribbean and Pacific Island Literatures (2007) and currently completing a book about climate change, empire, and the literary and visual arts.

 


 

June 15, 2014.  Border Songs: Western Literature Association Annual Conference 2014, Nov. 5–8, 2014.  The 49th Annual Meeting of the Western Literature Association will be held just south of the 49th parallel, returning to Canada for the first time since 1998. The conference will take place at the Fairmont Empress Hotel in downtown Victoria BC.

To highlight a conference site from which two countries, and the homelands of several nations, are visible, we have taken our title theme from Washington State writer Jim Lynch’s novel Border Songs.  Singer songwriter Connie Kaldor’s concert will be a highlight.  In addition to proposals on any aspect of the literatures of the North American West, we encourage panels and papers that cross disciplines and/or explore dimensions of the conference theme, singing borders and bordering on song:
• Border crossings broadly interpreted
• First Nations/Native American song, story, and writing
• Songs in, and musical settings of western writing
• The singer/songwriter, the cowgirl/cowboy poet, the storyteller
• Poetry, stories, creative nonfiction with musical accompaniment

We are open to session proposals focused on storytelling and teaching, to workshops and round table discussions, and to other sessions that stretch conventional academic formats.  Deadline: June 15, 2014.  Please submit abstracts, proposals, or questions to Anne Kaufman and Laurie Ricou at WLAconference14@gmail.com.

Graduate Students: awards and funding opportunities are available to support your WLA paper presentations. See http://www.westernlit.org/students-attending-the-wla-conference/.

For more information, see www.westernlit.org/wla-conference-2014/.


  

Deadline Extended: June 20, 2014.  Ecocritical Perspectives on Cities: Midwest MLA (MMLA) Associated Organizations Panel sponsored by The Association for the Study of Literature and the Environment. The 56th Annual MMLA Convention will be held in Detroit, Michigan at the Double Tree Hotel by Hilton from November 13-16, 2014.

In response to the 2014 MMLA conference theme "The Lives of Cities," this panel seeks papers that explore “the lives of cities” from an ecocritical perspective.  Some possible topics include, but are not limited to: literary or filmic representations of urban nature; recent trends in urban / suburban ecology (such as urban farming); cities’ responses to natural disasters; the rhetoric of urban sustainability; environmental justice in urban settings; the role of the humanities in urban sustainability; and teaching ecocriticism in urban settings.

Please submit a 250-300 word abstract including a paper title to Dr. Lisa Ottum at ottuml@xavier.edu by June 20.


 

June 20, 2014. Poetic Sustainability: Affiliated Group Session - The Emily Dickinson International Society, The South Atlantic Modern Language Association conference. Atlanta, Georgia, November 7-9, 2014.

The Emily Dickinson International Society invites creative and scholarly presentations investigating how the work of Emily Dickinson explores, accepts, and rejects the ideas of ecocriticism and radical homemaking. How does her work portray the value of the natural world? How can we (or can we) place her work within contemporary discussions of domesticity and radical homemaking? While we are, of course, interested in projects that focus on Emily Dickinson, we are open to discussions of poetry in general, particularly the ways in which poetry continues to be sustained amid technological advances that both threaten and enhance traditional ways of teaching, writing, and reading poems. By June 20, 2014, please send a CV and a 250-word abstract to Trisha Kannan at trisha.kannan@sfcollege.edu.

Selected papers presented at the panel will be considered for inclusion in a book project to be submitted to Lexington Books' Ecocritical Theory and Practice series.


 

New deadline: Friday, June 20, 2014. Semiotic Society of America 39th Annual Meeting.  Following requests from several colleagues and institutions, the Semiotic Society of America is pleased to extend the deadline for submitting abstracts for our 39th Annual Meeting, which will take place in Seattle, October 2-5, 2014. The new deadline is Friday, June 20, 2014.

We have received a many abstracts and anticipate receiving a significant number of additional submissions. Because space is limited, we encourage interested scholars to submit their proposals as soon as possible.

Our non-restrictive conference theme is "Paradoxes of Life: Challenge - Determination - Resilience." Contributions on any other topics related to semiotics are welcome. For conference information and submission guidelines, please visit our NEW conference page at http://semioticsocietyofamerica.org/2014-annual-meeting/

In addition, we invite you to follow us on Facebook and Twitter to keep up with the latest news on the SSA and other initiatives in the world of semiotics.


 

Deadline Extended: July 1, 2014. Eco-Imaginaries: 4th Annual Tufts Graduate Humanities Conference. Conference Date: October 10, 2014.
Conference Website: http://tuftsgradhumanitiesconference.wordpress.com/

As humans, we are continually examining how to position ourselves spatially, aesthetically, emotionally, intellectually, and practically in our environments. Today, we face these tasks with new urgency as the devastating impact of global climate change stimulates renewed scholarly focus on the environment. From Ecocriticism to Posthumanism to Deep Ecology studies, the humanities are engaged in a multi-disciplinary effort to understand how humans interact with natural and built environments. This conference aims to engage with and foster discussions around the complex and historically situated ways in which we imagine and inhabit the environment.

The 2014 Tufts Graduate Humanities Conference seeks to bring together papers that attend to the ways environments are imagined, produced, and articulated in diverse contexts and mediums. Some questions to consider:
•    How have humanistic discourses responded to environmental crises, past and ongoing?
•    What are the aesthetic innovations that have helped represent the sedimented histories of colonialism, global capitalism, and histories of devastation?
•    What role do the linked histories of racism, colonialism, sexism, and militarism play in our imaginings of, and relationships to, the environment?
•    What is the role of art in depicting and understanding ongoing human and natural global devastation?
•    What role does political economy play in discourses of environmentalism?
•    How might we engage with indigenous knowledges when discussing the complex interactions between local and global, without fetishizing either?
•    How do communities—large and small—articulate their identities in more symbiotic and reciprocal ways with their environments?
•    How can we engage terms like ‘ecology,’ ‘environment,’ and ‘humanities’ in order to invite new modes of analysis and representation which more ably reflect histories of devastation, toxic activity, and violence—both human and natural?
•    How might we re-imagine and re-articulate more equitable and sustainable futures for the environment?

Eco-Imaginaries welcomes papers, from all disciplines and fields, whose work participates in emergent conversations about the environment in the humanities. Please send your abstract of no more than 300 words, along with a short bio, to tuftsgradhumanitiesconference@gmail.com by July 1, 2014.

Keynote: Elizabeth DeLoughrey is an associate professor of English and of the Institute for the Environment and Sustainability at the University of California, Los Angeles. She is co-editor of Caribbean Literature and the Environment (2005), Postcolonial Ecologies: Literatures of the Environment (2011) and Global Ecologies: Postcolonial Approaches to the Environmental Humanities (forthcoming). She is the author of Routes and Roots: Navigating Caribbean and Pacific Island Literatures (2007) and currently completing a book about climate change, empire, and the literary and visual arts.


 

July 20, 2014.  Kyoto Conference on Coleridge and Contemplation, 27-29 March, 2015. An international, interdisciplinary conference on Coleridge and Contemplation. Abstracts are welcome on Coleridge and meditation / contemplation /poetic thinking. Further details and a downloadable cfp poster here: http://kyotocontemplation.org/call-for-papers/

Please contact Peter Cheyne, English Dept, Kyoto Notre Dame University, (cheyne@notredame.ac.jp) with questions.
www.kyotocontemplation.org


 

September 30, 2014. Waste Matters: Environmental Pollution and Materiality.  ASLE-Sponsored seminar or panel proposed for the Northeast Modern Language Association 46th Annual Convention, Toronto, Ontario, April 30-May 3, 2015.

Literary, filmic, and artistic media are littered with representations of environmental pollution and waste, whether in accounts of catastrophe and crisis or in stories of scavenging and survival. From e-waste shipped from the U.S. to China and Africa, to trash salvaged by cartoneros in Central and South America, to nuclear and oil spill contamination spread across the globe, to trash accumulated in space, waste increasingly appears in literature, film, and visual arts not simply as a symbol of the abject but as a material force shaping contemporary life. This seminar seeks to facilitate an interdisciplinary conversation about how writers and other artists represent pollution and waste as material concerns. Participants might address questions such as:

How have varied cultural and historical contexts shaped understandings of pollution and waste as material concerns? How was pollution understood materially prior to the emergence of this terminology in the mid-nineteenth century, and prior to the twentieth-century environmental movement? How does the original notion of pollution as moral contamination continue to inform discourse on material waste?

How is the materiality of environmental pollution understood in relation to social justice? How have the social meanings and material impacts of waste been mapped onto marginalized populations? Who or what controls the production of knowledge—and of uncertainty—regarding pollution and waste?

To what extent are pollution and waste depicted as “vital” actants (Jane Bennett 2010) or “violent” social forces (Rob Nixon 2011)? How are they perceived on the micro-scale of the particle, via the everyday experience of the body, or through a macro-view of the planet? How are human bodies, nonhuman nature, and waste understood as interrelational agents?

What kinds of affective or aesthetic responses do pollution and waste invite, facilitate, or foreclose? How do writers and other artists engage audiences aesthetically, affectively, and critically in their representations of pollution and waste?

This session will be a seminar with pre-circulated papers, short presentations, and discussion if we have 5-10 participants, or a traditional panel if we have 3-4 participants. Please submit 300-500 word abstracts on the NeMLA website by 9/30/14: https://nemla.org/convention/2015/cfp.html#cfp15511. Contact Jill Gatlin (jill.gatlin at necmusic.edu) with any other inquiries.


 

September 30, 2014. Urban Ecologies: Historical Perspectives, panel at the Northeast Modern Language Association 46th Annual Convention, Toronto, Ontario, April 30-May 3, 2015.  Ecocriticism focuses increasingly on urban environments, often in contemporary contexts. But the city has affected ecologies for centuries. Seeking papers dealing with literary perspectives on urban ecologies from the premodern to 1900, including topics such as (but not limited to): pollution, population, nonhuman city dwellers, anti-urbanism, migration, early globalization, cosmopolitan environmentalism, etc.  Please send 250-word abstracts of 15-minute papers by September 30, 2014; to submit an abstract, please go to www.nemla.org and follow the instructions there to create a user account, and submit an abstract directly to this session.  Panel organizer: Troy Boone, boone@pitt.edu.

 

January, 16, 2015. THE NORTH AMERICAN REVIEW BICENTENNIAL CREATIVE WRITING & LITERATURE CONFERENCE, June 11–13, 2015, at the University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls, IA. Keynotes: Martín Espada, Patricia Hampl, Steven Schwartz

The North American Review, the longest-lived literary magazine in the United States, is pleased to announce that it is now accepting submissions to its Bicentennial Creative Writing & Literature Conference, to be held on the campus of the University of Northern Iowa in Cedar Falls, IA, June 11-13, 2015. The editors invite proposals for individual papers, pre-formed panels (3-4 panelists), or roundtable discussions (4-6 participants).

Critical papers, panels, and roundtables may be submitted on any literary or cultural topic, theme, author, art work, or text that has some connection (broadly conceived) to the North American Review. Group society proposals are welcome.

Creative Writing proposals may include readings of your own creative work, explorations of the craft and theory of writing, or discussions of creative writing pedagogy, the publishing world, the professionalization of creative writing, or creative writing as a discipline in the university. Visit https://northamericanreview.submittable.com/submit to upload your submission.  Deadline for submissions is January, 16, 2015.

More details about the magazine and the conference can be found at http://northamericanreview.wordpress.com and www.northamericanreview.org.
The entire North American Review archives can be accessed digitally via the JSTOR database (http://www.jstor.org); issues appearing from 1815 to 1899 can be searched or browsed at Cornell University’s Making of America Website (http://ebooks.library.cornell.edu/m/moa); and an index of authors and subjects in the North American Review from 1815 to 1877 is available through Google Books (http://bit.ly/1mGlg5A). A list of notable contributors is available at http://northamericanreview.wordpress.com.

If you have a question or need assistance in locating a source, contact the conference director Jeremy Schraffenberger at schraffj@uni.edu.


 

Conferences of Interest