Day

January 16, 2019

TREES IN/AND/AROUND LITERATURE IN THE ANTHROPOCENE

TREES IN/AND/AROUND LITERATURE IN THE ANTHROPOCENE University of Turin, Italy 21st May 2019

“I’m interested in the particularity of each Tree – it’s ‘thisness’ (haecceitas)”, claims Canadian land-artist, photographer, and poet Marlene Creates, thus hinting both at the specificity of each singular tree and at the uniqueness of certain species at different latitudes. Literature, among other arts, such as film, photography, the fine arts, is one of those privileged terrains where Trees definitely enter our field of vision, our epistemic knowledge, our sensorial experience. In literary ...

Reworking Georgic

Call for Papers REWORKING GEORGIC University of Leeds Monday 9th – Tuesday 10th September 2019

Confirmed speakers: David Fairer (Leeds), Greg Garrard (British Columbia), Sue Edney (Bristol) Including a reading of poetry and prose with Simon Armitage, Helen Jukes, and Jack Thacker

The influence and spirit of ‘georgic’, as a genre or mode – named for Virgil’s Georgics, the primary classical model – can be seen across western art and culture: from medieval and early modern almanacs to eighteenth-century formal georgic poems, from pre-Raphaelite social paintings to the new nature writing of ...

Waters Rising: A Special Issue of Green Letters on Imaginations of Floods

Waters Rising: A Special Issue of Green Letters

With a tradition dating back at least to the epics (e.g. Gilgamesh and Noah’s Ark), stories of floods have long been literary metaphors of great rhetorical power and familiar imagery; water can be a punishment for imagined wrongdoings and a means of washing away old worlds and starting afresh. The language of flooding permeates popular culture as a metaphor for forces out of control. In our current moment of environmental crisis, floods are often invoked to ...

Green Religion and American Literature

ANQ (A&HCI) Call for Papers Green Religion and American Literature Deadline for Submissions: 1 May, 2019

Following the realization that global ecological crises will not be resolved by advances in science and technology, an increasing number of intellectuals, environmental activists, and religious leaders have sought to address the problems (of hopelessness, of government inaction) by looking to the power of religion. Interdisciplinary work combining elements of Religious Studies, Environmental Studies, and the study of culture has been promoted by scholars such as Mary Evelyn Tucker, ...