Member Bookshelf

Thoreau’s Religion: Walden Woods, Social Justice, and the Politics of Asceticism

Christy Tidwell

By Alda Balthrop-Lewis. Cambridge University Press, 2021. 

Thoreau’s Religion presents a ground-breaking interpretation of Henry David Thoreau’s most famous book, Walden. Rather than treating Walden Woods as a lonely wilderness, Balthrop-Lewis demonstrates that Thoreau’s ascetic life was a form of religious practice dedicated to cultivating a just, multispecies community. The book makes an important contribution to scholarship in religious studies, political theory, English, environmental studies, and critical theory by offering the first sustained reading of Thoreau’s religiously motivated politics. In Balthrop-Lewis’s vision, practices ...

The More Extravagant Feast

Christy Tidwell

By Leah Naomi Green. Graywolf Press, 2020. 

Winner of the Walt Whitman Award of the Academy of American Poets (selected by Li-Young Lee), The More Extravagant Feast focuses on the trophic exchanges of a human body with the world via pregnancy, motherhood, and interconnection—the acts of making and sustaining other bodies from one’s own, and one’s own from the larger world. Leah Naomi Green writes from attentiveness to the vast availability and capacity of the weedy, fecund earth and from her own human place within more-than-human life, death, and birth. Lyrically and ...

Waymarking Italy’s Influence on the American Environmental Imagination While on Pilgrimage to Assisi

Christy Tidwell

By Robert Lawrence France. Cambridge Scholars, 2020. 

Waymarking Italy’s Influence on the American Environmental Imagination While on Pilgrimage to Assisi describes a peripatetic pilgrimage that is equal parts a daily description of a 200-kilometre walk from the “wounded mountain” of La Verna to the “tortured river” near Assisi, and an examination of the incredible debt owed to Italy in terms of ecocultural and environmental thought.  Rooted in the philosophy of Tim Ingold (Being Alive: Essays on Movement, Knowledge and Description, 2011), the book provides an ...

Half-Life of Empathy

Christy Tidwell

By Rebecca A. Durham. New Rivers Press, 2020. 

Half-life of Empathy interrogates the complex human/non-human relationship in the Anthropocene. Rooted in the author’s deep fascination and scientific knowledge of ecology, these poems take literal experiences and explore/distort them with language. Moving away from the traditional nature poem, this work enacts an ecology where a human speaker is decentered and earth regains agency.

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“What a beautiful use of the words of water and geology and all things living. Durham writes a new ecological poetry, resonant, rich, and ...

OYO, the Beautiful River: An environmental narrative in two parts

Christy Tidwell

By Mark B. Hamilton. Shanti Arts Press, 2020. 

OYO, The Beautiful River is environmental literature, a book-length sequence of lyric narratives written from a journey down the Ohio River from Pittsburgh, PA, to Cairo, IL, in a 15-foot rowing dory. It explores the vulnerability of identity and relationships within this oftentimes polluted and quickly changing place we call home, our nation, this world. A theme of reciprocity develops between self and river, between the human and the elemental, and honors the First Nations with a ...

Chinese Women Writers on the Environment: A Multi-Ethnic Anthology of Fiction and Nonfiction

Christy Tidwell

Edited by Dong Isbister, Xiumei Pu, and Stephen D. Rachman. McFarland Books, 2020. 

The stories, prose and poems in this anthology offer readers a unique and generous array of women’s experiences in China. In a world that is rapidly modernizing, these writings attempt to reconcile with the ever-changing people, plants, beasts and environment. After five years of painstaking collection and translation, the authors present these stories of strength and sadness, defiance and resilience, urban and village life, from the days of the cultural revolution ...

Utah’s Air Quality Issues: Problems and Solutions

Christy Tidwell

Edited by Hal Crimmel. The University of Utah Press, 2020.

Although Utah is a land of outdoor wonders, the state has a distressing air pollution problem. In some areas like Salt Lake City, geography exacerbates the issue; air quality in the Wasatch Front metropolitan region often ranks among the worst in the nation. Utah’s Air Quality Issues: Problems and Solutions is the first book to tackle the subject. Written by scholars in a variety of fields, including chemical engineering, economics, atmospheric science, health care, law, ...

Visualizando el Cambio: Humanidades Ambientales / Envisioning Change: Environmental Humanities

Edited by Carmen Flys-Junquera and Alejandro Rivero-Vadillo.  Vernon Press, October 2020.  ISBN: 9781648890376

The 21st century has been described by many environmental scholars as the one in which humanity will need to face its greatest challenge. The diverse ramifications of the climatic crisis are perhaps the most evident proof of this. This dual-lingual multiauthor volume reflects different perspectives of envisioning an eco-social change towards a more sustainable and just society. Musings on the philosophical implications of utopias, ecofeminism, biopolitics, and biomimicry come together with ...

Eating Chilli Crab in the Anthropocene: Environmental Perspectives on Life in Singapore

Edited by Matthew Schneider-Mayerson. Ethos Books, June 2020.

The first environmental humanities book about Singapore, Eating Chilli Crab in the Anthropocene examines the ways that Singaporean life and culture is deeply entangled with the nonhuman lives that flourish in the small island city-state. From chilli crab to Tiger Beer, Changi Airport to Pulau Semakau, these essays offer new perspectives on familiar Singaporean subjects, bringing an environmental humanities lens to the study of Singapore in ground-breaking ways—such as a chapter on Malay orang minyak films ...

Last West: Roadsongs for Dorothea Lange

Christy Tidwell

By Tess Taylor. Museum of Modern Art, 2020. 

In Last West, Tess Taylor follows Dorothea Lange’s 1935-1942 paths across California, journeys on which Lange photographed migrant laborers, carrot pickers, dust bowl refugees, tent camps, and the painful realities of Japanese internment. Taylor’s hybrid texts collage lyric and oral histories against Lange’s own journals and notebook fragments, framing the ways the social and ecological injustices of the past rhyme eerily with those of the present. The result is a stunning meditation on movement, landscape, and ...

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