Member Bookshelf

Placing John Haines

Placing John Haines

By James Perrin Warren. Fairbanks: University of Alaska Press, 2017.

John Haines arrived in Alaska, fresh out of the Navy, in 1947 and established a homestead seventy miles southeast of Fairbanks. He stayed there nearly twenty-five years, learning to live off the country: hunting, trapping, fishing, gathering berries, and growing vegetables. Those years formed him as a writer, and the interior of Alaska and its boreal forest influenced his poetry and prose and helped him find his unique voice.

Placing John Haines, the ...

Critical Ecofeminism

Critical Ecofeminism

By Greta Gaard. Lexington Books: Lanham, MD, 2017.

Australian feminist philosopher Val Plumwood coined the term “critical ecofeminism” to “situate humans in ecological terms and nonhumans in ethical terms,” for “the two tasks are interconnected, and cannot be addressed properly in isolation from each other.” Variously using the terms “critical ecological feminism,” “critical antidualist ecological feminism,” and “critical ecofeminism,” Plumwood’s work developed amid a range of perspectives describing feminist intersections with ecopolitical issues—i.e., toxic production and toxic wastes, indigenous sovereignty, global economic justice, ...

Ibsen Studies

Ibsen Studies

By Amir Hossain. LAP LAMBERT Academic Publishing, 2017.

Ibsen Studies focuses upon the critical evaluation of Henrik Ibsen and his literary writing in many respects. To write this book, the author selected the three major plays by Ibsen, including A Doll’s House, Ghosts, and An Enemy of the People. The aim of the author is to investigate the empowerment of women in the light of Ibsen’s attitudes and his critics. In this book, he has tried to highlight the social problems of 19th-century ...

Posthuman Lear: Reading Shakespeare in the Anthropocene

Posthuman Lear: Reading Shakespeare in the Anthropocene

By Craig Dionne. Punctum Books, 2016.

Approaching King Lear from an eco-materialist perspective, Posthuman Lear examines how the shift in Shakespeare’s tragedy from court to stormy heath activates a different sense of language as tool-being — from that of participating in the flourish of aristocratic prodigality and circumstance, to that of survival and pondering one’s interdependence with a denuded world. Dionne frames the thematic arc of Shakespeare’s tragedy about the fall of a king as a tableaux of ...

Affective Ecologies: Empathy, Emotion, and Environmental Narrative

Affective Ecologies: Empathy, Emotion, and Environmental Narrative

By Alexa Weik von Mossner. Ohio State University Press: Columbus, OH 2017.

Affective Ecologies: Empathy, Emotion, and Environmental Narrative explores our emotional engagement with environmental narrative. Focusing on the American cultural context, Alexa Weik von Mossner develops an ecocritical approach that draws on the insights of affective science and cognitive narratology. This approach helps to clarify how we interact with environmental narratives in ways that are both biologically universal and culturally specific. In doing so, it pays particular ...

SENTINELS; a Florida mythos

SENTINELS; a Florida mythos

By Rich McKee. Venice, FL: Brookside Lit, 2017

Riddling eco-fiction collides with literary satire in Sentinels, a tale of two radical environmentalists, Sean McDuff and Jane Kowechobe, who get deeply involved in fringe government efforts to expand Everglades National Park after a catastrophic hurricane flattens and floods much of South Florida.  Of course many Sinshine State politicians are opposed to such Green shenanigans, and covertly hire hunters to seek out and kill endangered species in the proposed protected wilderness and wetlands, ...

Hawk on Wire: Ecopoems

Hawk on Wire: Ecopoems

By Scott T. Starbuck. Fomite Press: Burlington, VT 2017.

Climate change science and prophecy explored in poetry are themes in Hawk on Wire: Ecopoems with endorsements from notable writers John Shoptaw, John Keeble, Daniela Gioseffi, Anne Elvey, Simmons B. Buntin, Gail Entrekin, Michael Spring, Thomas Rain Crowe, Teresa Mei Chuc, Senior Research Scientist at IPAC Caltech Yun Wang, Prartho Sereno, Eric Magrane, and Daniel Hudon. The book is a record of ecological disaster caused by global heating, and informed prophecy of ...

Nature’s Temples: The Complex World of Old-Growth Forests

Nature’s Temples: The Complex World of Old-Growth Forests

By Joan Maloof.  Portland, Oregon: Timber Press, 2016.

“An old-growth forest is one that has formed naturally over a long period of time with little or no disturbance from humankind. They are increasingly rare and largely misunderstood. In Nature’s Temples, Joan Maloof, the director of the Old-Growth Forest Network, makes a heartfelt and passionate case for their importance. This evocative and accessible narrative defines old-growth and provides a brief history of forests. It offers a rare view ...

Exceptional Mountains: A Cultural History of the Pacific Northwest Volcanoes

Exceptional Mountains: A Cultural History of the Pacific Northwest Volcanoes

By O. Alan Weltzien.  University of Nebraska Press: Lincoln, NE, 2016.

Over the past 150 years, people have flocked to the Pacific Northwest in increasing numbers, in part due to the region’s beauty and one of its most exceptional features: volcanoes. This segment of the Pacific Ring of Fire has shaped not only the physical landscape of the region but also the psychological landscape, and with it the narratives we compose about ourselves. Exceptional Mountains ...

Rembrandt in the Stairwell

Rembrandt in the Stairwell

By O. Alan Weltzien.  FootHills Publishing: Kanona, New York, 2016.

“Rembrandt in the Stairwell begins in the wild land of the Northwest, then navigates the complex interior of memory as it is woven into the present. Alan Weltzien imagines rooms where images of ancestors and the “ghosts” of grown children linger even as he contemplates ‘the day’s traffic and the world.’ These poems are often elegiac, sometimes ironic or celebratory, and a pleasure to read.” —Tami Haaland, former ...