Seed, Soil and the Soul: A Critical Analysis of World Food Practices

Professor: Deborah Adelman
Institution: College of DuPage
Course Number: BIOLOGY 1110 AND ENGLISH 1130

HONORS SEMINAR: BIOLOGY 1110 AND ENGLISH 1130

Seed, Soil and the Soul: A Critical Analysis of World Food Practices

College of DuPage — Fall Semester, 2006
Class meets Tue 10 – 11:50 AM in IC 2D & 12 – 1:15 PM in IC 3042
Thurs 10 AM – 1:15 PM in IC 3042

Students are responsible for familiarizing themselves with, and adhering to, all academic policies as described in the College of DuPage Catalogue/Student Handbook.

This seminar has reduced seat time by 1 hour a week.
The 16 hours that are TBA will largely consist of independent lab work.

Seminar Description:

The seminar will explore food as a key to understanding human cultures and human relationships with the environment.  The study of food offers a rich and unique focal point from which to engage in an interdisciplinary inquiry because food encompasses a wide variety of human activities.  Through topics relating to the production and consumption of food, we will focus on the interface of contemporary scientific and literary thought and explore the similarities and differences in the ways the disciplines of biology and literature account for the most fundamental of human activities: feeding ourselves.  Learning methods include reading, class discussion, independent labs, field trips, reflective writing, and service learning.

Instructors:

Dr. Deborah Adelman – English
Office: IC 2059f
Office Hours: Monday 12:00 – 3:00 PM (on-line hours)
Tuesday 1:30-2:00  PM
Wednesday 9:00 AM– 1:00 PM
Thursday 1:30-2:00 PM
Friday  8:00 AM –10:00 AM (on-line hours)
Telephone: (630) 942-3406
E-mail: [email protected]

Dr. Shamili Ajgaonkar Sandiford – Biology
Office: IC 2059d
Office Hours: Monday 9:30 – 11:50 AM
Tuesday 9:30 – 9:50 AM & 1:30 – 3:50 PM
Wednesday 9:30 – 9:50 AM & 2:00 – 3:50 PM
Thursday 9:30 – 9:50 AM & 1:30 – 2:50 PM
Telephone: (630) 942-2123
E-mail: [email protected]

Course Materials:

REQUIRED READING (TO BE PURCHASED)
Environment: The Science Behind the Stories by Jay Withgott & Scott Brennan (2nd edition)
Worldwatch Paper 148 — Nature’s Cornucopia: Our Stake in Plant Diversity by John Tuxill
Worldwatch Paper 171 — Happier Meals: Rethinking the Global Meat Industry by Danielle Nierenberg
Worldwatch Paper 163 — Home Grown: The Case For Local Food in a Global Market by Brian Halweil
Ishmael by Daniel Quinn
O Pioneers! by Willa Cather
Whose Names are Unknown by Sanora Babb
My Year of Meats by Ruth Ozeki
Goodwill by Jane Smiley

RECOMMENDED READING (TO BE PURCHASED)
Worldwatch Paper 150 — Overfed and Underfed: The Global Epidemic of Malnutrition by Gary Gardner and Brian Halweil
Under the Feet of Jesus by Helena Maria Viramontes

REQUIRED READING (ON RESERVE IN THE LIBRARY)
Hungry Planet by Peter Menzel and Faith D’Aluisio
The Omnivore’s Dilemma by Michael Pollan
Fast Food Nation by Eric Schlosser

RECOMMENDED READING (ON RESERVE IN THE LIBRARY)
Fast Food Nation by Eric Schlosser
Additional readings will be assigned as per the class schedule.  These readings will be provided as handouts.


BIOLOGY 1110: ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGY

COURSE OBJECTIVES
This 4-credit lab science course is an interdisciplinary study of the environment that uses the lens of food and agriculture to investigate how nature works and how things are interconnected.  Based on an understanding of ecological concepts and principles, we will examine lifestyle issues and critically analyze the relationships between population, natural resources, agriculture, industrialization, and pollution.  Upon completion of this course, you should be able to:
• Describe key environmental and ecological concepts
• Explain key biological, chemical, and physical principles operating in the world environment and how all things are interconnected
• Describe the scientific method and apply it in understanding environmental processes
• Demonstrate an understanding of the long-range nature of environmental processes
• Examine lifestyle issues and critically analyze the relationships between population, natural resources, land use, agriculture, biodiversity, industrialization, and pollution
• Critically analyze and debate environmental issues
• Analyze global issues from a biological perspective and assess the relevance of biology to solving contemporary problems in human society
• Demonstrate science literacy in environmental biology
• Develop a broad understanding of the place of humans in the environment; and evaluate desirable and undesirable practices of humans as they interact with their environment
• Develop knowledge and skills to work toward solutions to environmental problems

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

Attendance and Participation: You are required to complete assigned readings and come prepared to engage in class activities that will include lectures, discussions, and small group activities.

Lab Inquiries: The six labs will relate to the topics we are covering in the seminar and enhance understanding of course material.  They will require you work independently to apply material learned through the readings and from class activities in critically analyzing key ideas, conducting research, and examining personal lifestyle issues.  Instructions for completing each lab assignment will be provided.

Biology Quizzes: At several points in the semester there will be short quizzes to test your comprehension of the biology course material.

Written Reflections: You will write three essays based on questions we provide.  The purpose is to provide you an opportunity to integrate biology with literature in critically analyzing how we feed ourselves.

Service Learning: As a seminar participant you are expected to contribute 20 hours of your time (some done as part of class) to the COD Community Garden and the People’s Resource Center.  Instructions for completing this assignment will be provided.

Food Biography: For this assignment you will conduct a life history analysis of a food item.  You will work on this project in teams of 2 people.  Instructions for completing this assignment will be provided.  This assignment will require substantial library research.

GRADING
Grades will be based on the points earned as follows:
Attendance & Participation (4% of grade) 20 points
Lab Inquiries (36% of grade) – 6 @ 30 points ea. 180 points
Biology Quizzes (15% of grade) – 5 @ 15 points ea. 75 points
Written Reflections (15% of grade) – 3 @ 25 points ea. 75 points
Service Learning (10% of grade) 50 points
Food Biography (20% of grade) 100 points
500 points


ENGLISH 1130: INTRODUCTION TO LITERATURE

COURSE OBJECTIVES
My intention in this course is to help you develop analytical skills in approaching literature, thus making your encounters with literary texts, deeper, more meaningful and enjoyable.  In this course we will define ”literature” as a body of creative texts in a variety of genres that explore human lives, experiences, and societies.  Our readings which will all focus on topics of food, culture, and agriculture, will include texts from US and international authors, focusing primarily on contemporary work.

The study of literature is in a moment of great change, challenging many previous assumptions.  Accordingly, throughout the course we will attempt to address three broad questions: why, what and how we read, assuming there will be no simple answers.  At the same time, we will focus on the more specific, often technical issues of how each genre works.  What are the elements of a story?  How does a poem make its meaning?  How does reading fiction differ from reading non-fiction?

Basically this class will be held as a seminar.  I expect you to talk and participate actively in class.  We will discuss literature together, perhaps disagreeing with each other’s readings, but always trying to work together to come to a deeper understanding of what we are reading and writing.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

Attendance and Participation: You are required to complete assigned readings and come prepared to engage in class activities that will include lectures, discussions, and small group activities.

Biography of a Writer: This assignment will provide you an opportunity to explore the life of one of the writers we will encounter during the seminar.  This is a team project for which you are required to work in pairs.  Your team will be required to make a class presentation on the life and work of the writer you select at the time that we are reading the writer’s work.  Detailed instructions for successfully completing this assignment will be provided.

Book Quizzes: For each of the five books we read, as well as the three required Worldwatch papers we will start class discussion with a short quiz.

Written Reflections: You will write three essays based on questions we provide.  The purpose is to provide you an opportunity to integrate biology with literature in critically analyzing how we feed ourselves.

Service Learning: As a seminar participant you are expected to contribute 20 hours of your time (some will be done as part of class) to the COD Community Garden and the People’s Resource Center.  Instructions for completing this assignment will be provided.

Food Biography: For this assignment you will conduct a life history analysis of a food.  You will work on this project in teams of 2 people.  Instructions for completing this assignment will be provided.  This assignment will require substantial library research.

GRADING
Grades will be based on the percentage basis as outlined below:
Attendance & Participation (4% of grade) 20 points
Biography of a Writer (20% of grade) 100 points
Book Quizzes (16% of grade) – 8 @ 10 points ea.  80 points
Written Reflections (30% of grade) – 3 @ 50 points ea. 150 points
Service Learning (10% of grade) 50 points
Food Biography (20% of grade) 100 points
500 points

SEMINAR PHILOSOPHY & EXPECTATIONS
As an interdisciplinary program, this seminar links two related catalog courses into one melded offering.  We connect the courses through lecture, class discussions, and shared assignments where work in one course may apply directly to, or provide background or elaboration for another course.

Attendance is mandatory because of the highly concentrated nature of every class meeting.  If absence is unavoidable due to illness or other emergency, the appropriate instructor should be contacted as soon as possible.  However, you are responsible for all information given during missed classes, for there is no way we can reproduce an entire class session.  Therefore, we will ask you to pick a buddy and exchange phone numbers and e-mail addresses to help each other keep track of the class work.

Cooperation is necessary.  You must bring a positive “can do” attitude, complete with willingness to participate, to keep up with the group, and in general help foster a sense of community.  Also, in a class that meets for long periods of time, your willingness to contribute as well as to listen actively is necessary to create a lively, interesting atmosphere for learning.  Participation and questions are welcome, private conversations are not.  All electronic devices (cellular phones, pagers, etc.) must be turned off, only tape recorders are accepted only for the purpose of recording the lecture.  We will take breaks and you are encouraged to bring nourishment for yourself and to share with the class if you like.  We will do our part; you must do yours.

Assistance is always available.  We will be more than happy to help you in any way we can to make this class a success for you.  It is the student’s responsibility to make the instructors aware of their disability and of their specific needs (extra time or specific devices).  If you have any trouble with the different assignments, make an appointment with either of us and we will try to find the best solution for you.  In class, we will not address the details of the independent homework.  Should these assignments prove too difficult, again, use the office hours.

Academic honesty is expected.  Plagiarism includes not only copying directly from another source without acknowledging the source, but also rewriting the material in your own words without acknowledging that you have done that.  If the idea belongs to another, do not pass it off as your own.  Plagiarism is grounds for failure and can become part of your academic record, affecting your chances for success in your career.

Sounds like hard work?  It is!  The concentrated class time and out-of-class work do call for an abundance of motivation and self-discipline, but students who answer the challenge discover the rewards of achievement.  You will discover relationships between course contents, develop a deeper and more meaningful understanding of the topics we cover, find more relevance in your schoolwork, and benefit from the efficient grouping of courses and assignments.

Grades for both classes will be assigned using the following scale:
450 – 500 points: A
400 – 449 points: B
350 – 399 points: C
300 – 349 points: D
Below 300 points: F

No incomplete grades will be assigned.  All deadlines are fixed, and failure to meet any of them will result in 0% for that component.  Exceptions will be considered only under extenuating circumstances.

MY BUDDY:
Name:
Phone:
E-mail:


Course Schedule

Honors Seminar: Fall Semester 2006 Schedule

Seed, Soil and the Soul: A Critical Analysis of World Food Practices

Please remember this schedule is tentative and is subject to change
Also remember that 16 hours are TBA (they will largely consist of independent lab work)

TUESDAY (10–11:50 am in IC 2D & 12–1:15 pm in IC 3042)
THURSDAY (10 am–1:15 pm in IC 3099)

WEEK 1
8/22    INSERVICE DAY – NO CLASS
8/24    TOPICS:
Introduction to the Seminar
Setting up the Framework for Analyzing Food Practices
FILM & DISCUSSION: The Global Banquet

WEEK 2
8/29    TOPIC:
Setting up the Framework for Analyzing Food Practices

BIOLOGY READING:
Text Chapter 1

LITERATURE READING:
Alan Ginzberg – “Supermarket in California”
David Orr – “What is Education For?”

SERVICE LEARNING:
Introduction to Service Learning (due 11/28)
Field Trip to COD Community Garden

BIOLOGY LAB 1 ASSIGNED:
Exploring Your Connections to the Earth (due 9/12)

8/31    TOPICS:
Setting up the Framework for Analyzing Food Practices
Biography of a Writer

BIOLOGY READING:
Text Chapter 1

LITERATURE READING:
Jared Diamond – “The Worst Mistake in Human History”
Wendell Berry – “The Pleasures of Eating”
Albert Crosby – Hungry Planet: “Baked. Boiled, Roasted, and Fried” (pp 52-53)
Marion Nestle – Hungry Planet: “Foreword” (pp 7-9) (recommended)
Faith D’Aluisio – Hungry Planet: “Dinner is Served” (p 11-20) (recommended)

LIBRARY RESEARCH:
Biography of a Writer

WEEK 3

9/5      TOPIC:
Historical Roots & Worldviews

BIOLOGY READINGS:
Text Chapters 1 & 2

FILM & DISCUSSION:
The Environmental Revolution

SERVICE LEARNING:
Field Trip to People’s Resource Center September 7, 2006

9/7      TOPICS:
Historical Roots & Worldviews
What is Literature?  How Do We Read?

 BIOLOGY READINGS:
Text Chapters 1 & 2

LITERATURE READING:
Daniel Quinn – Ishmael

BOOK QUIZ:
Daniel Quinn – Ishmael

Week 4
9/12    TOPIC:
Structure & Function in Ecosystems

BIOLOGY READINGS:
Text Chapters 4, 5 (not population ecology), 6, & 7

FILMS & DISCUSSION:
Energy Flow in an Ecosystem
Nutrient Cycles

BIOLOGY LAB 1 DUE:
Exploring Your Connections to the Earth

BIOLOGY LAB 2 ASSIGNED:
Understanding Your Foodshed (due 10/3)

9/14    TOPIC:
Structure & Function in Ecosystems

BIOLOGY READINGS:
Text Chapters 4, 5 (not population ecology), 6, & 7

FILMS & DISCUSSION:
Natural Selection
The World’s Biomes

WEEK 5
9/19     INSERVICE DAY – NO CLASS

9/21     TOPIC:
Producing Food – Framework
Food Biographies

BIOLOGY READINGS:
Text Chapters 9 & 10

FILM & DISCUSSION:
Energy Flow in Agriculture

BIOLOGY QUIZ 1:
Text Chapters 1, 2, 4, 5 (not population ecology), 6, & 7

LIBRARY RESEARCH:
Food Biographies (due 12/12-14)

Week 6
9/26     TOPIC:
Producing Food – Framework

LITERATURE READING:
Willa Cather – O Pioneers!

BOOK QUIZ:
Willa Cather – O Pioneers!

AUTHOR BIOGRAPHY:
Willa Cather

WRITING REFLECTION 1 ASSIGNED:
Analyzing Changes in Food Practices (due 10/5)

9/28     TOPIC:
Producing Food – Framework

FIELD TRIP:
Kline Creek Farm

WEEK 7
10/3     TOPIC:
Producing Food – Seed

BIOLOGY READINGS:
Text Chapters 3, 10, & 11
WW Paper 148 – Nature’s Cornucopia

BOOK QUIZ:
WW Paper 148 – Nature’s Cornucopia

FILMS & DISCUSSION:
The Future of Food
Case Studies about Seed

BIOLOGY LAB 2 DUE:
Understanding Your Foodshed

BIOLOGY LAB 3 ASSIGNED:
Suburban Dream or the Nightmare of Urban Sprawl? (due 10/17)

10/5   TOPIC:
Case Study – Maize

LITERATURE READINGS:
Michael Pollan – The Omnivore’s Dilemma: Section 1, “Industrial Corn” (pp 1-119)
Anita Endrezze – “Corn Mother”

AUTHOR BIOGRAPHY:
Michael Pollan

FILMS & DISCUSSION:
Stories about Maize

WRITING REFLECTION 1 DUE:
Analyzing Changes in Food Practices

Week 8
10/10   TOPIC:
Producing Food – Soil

BIOLOGY READINGS:
Text Chapters 7 (review biomes and nutrient cycles), 9, & 13

LITERATURE READINGS:
Pablo Neruda – “A la fertilidad de la tierra”
Linda Hasselstrom – “Mulch”
Woody Guthrie – selected songs

AUTHOR BIOGRAPHY:
Woody Guthrie

FILMS & DISCUSSION:
Case Studies about Soil

10/12   TOPIC:
Producing Food – Pest Control

BIOLOGY READINGS:
Text Chapters 10 & 14

LITERATURE READING:
Rachel Carson – Silent Spring (excerpt)

FILMS & DISCUSSION:
Case Studies about Pest Control

BIOLOGY QUIZ 2:
Text Chapters 3, 7 (nutrient cycles), 9, 10 (genetic modification and crop diversity), 11, & 13

BIOLOGY LAB 4 ASSIGNED:
Down the Drain (due 10/26)

WEEK 9
10/17    TOPIC:
Producing Food – Water

 BIOLOGY READINGS:
Text Chapters 4 (review properties of water), 7 (review hydrological cycle), 14, & 15

LITERATURE READINGS:
Sandra Steingraber – “Living Downstream”
Sandra Steingraber – selected poems

AUTHOR BIOGRAPHY:
Rachel Carson & Sandra Steingraber

FILMS & DISCUSSION:
Case Studies in Water Use and Pollution

BIOLOGY LAB 3 DUE:
Suburban Dream or the Nightmare of Urban Sprawl?

10/19     TOPIC:
Producing Food – Water
Food from the Water

BIOLOGY READINGS:
Text Chapters 10 (aquaculture), 14, 15, & 16

LITERATURE READINGS:
Carl Safina – Hungry Planet: “Launching a Sea Ethic” (pp 202-205)
Hungry Planet – “The Manzos of Italy” (pp 174-179)
Hungry Planet – “The Ukitas of Japan” (pp 180-185)
Hungry Planet – “The Matsudas of Okinawa” (pp 186-195)

FILMS & DISCUSSION:
Case Studies on Water Use and Pollution
Case Studies on Seafood and Aquaculture

Week 10
10/24     TOPIC:
Producing Food – Energy and Tools

BIOLOGY READINGS:
Text Chapters 4 (review energy fundamentals), 17, 18, 19, 20, & 21

LITERATURE READINGS:
Meridel LeSeur – “Harvest”
Wendell Berry – “A Good Scythe”

AUTHOR BIOGRAPHY:
Wendell Berry

FILMS & DISCUSSION:
Case Studies in Agricultural Tools & Energy Choices

BIOLOGY QUIZ 3:
Text Chapters 4 (properties of water), 7 (hydrological cycle), 10 (aquaculture), 14, 15, & 16

10/26     TOPIC:
Producing Food – Energy and Tools

BIOLOGY READINGS:
Text Chapters 4 (review energy fundamentals), 17, 18, 19, 20, & 21

BIOLOGY LAB 4 DUE:
Down the Drain

BIOLOGY LAB 5 ASSIGNED:
HotHouse Planet (due 11/14)

WEEK 11

10/31     TOPIC:
Producing Food – Energy and Tools
Food Producers

BIOLOGY READINGS:
Text Chapters 4 (review energy fundamentals), 17, 18, 19, 20, & 21

LITERATURE READINGS:
Sanora Babb – Whose Names are Unknown

BOOK QUIZ:
Sanora Babb – Whose Names are Unknown

AUTHOR BIOGRAPHY:
Sanora Babb

11/2       TOPIC:
Food Producers

LITERATURE READINGS:
Woody Guthrie – selected songs

FILM & DISCUSSION:
Grapes of Wrath (film by John Ford) – view on own
Grapes of Wrath (documentary)

 AUTHOR BIOGRAPHY:
John Steinbeck

BIOLOGY QUIZ 4:
Text Chapters 4 (energy fundamentals), 17, 18, 19, 20, & 21

Week 12
11/7       TOPIC:
Consuming Food – Nutritional Choices and Constraints

BIOLOGY READINGS:
Text Chapter 10 (review)
WW Paper 150 – Underfed & Overfed (recommended)

LITERATURE READINGS:
Wendell Berry – “The Pleasures of Eating” (revisited)
Greg Critser – “Let them Eat Fat”
Francine Kaufman – Hungry Planet: “Diabesity” (pp 242-243)
Food First – “12 Myths about Hunger”

 FILMS & DISCUSSION:
Fat
The Food Industry
Business of Hunger 

11/9       TOPIC:
Consuming Food – A Source of Nourishment or Commodity?

BIOLOGY READINGS:
Text Chapters 2 (review) & 3 (review)

LITERATURE READINGS:
David Orr – “Prices and the Life Exchanged: Costs of the US Food
System”
Alan Durning – “Just a Cup of Coffee?”
James McPherson – “Loaf of Bread”
Mari Gallagher – “Examining the Impact of Food Deserts on Public Health in Chicago”
Hungry Planet – Country Profiles as assigned

AUTHOR BIOGRAPHY:
David Orr

FILMS & DISCUSSION:
The Bomb Under the World (excerpt)
Advertising and the End of the World

WEEK 13
11/14     TOPIC:
Consuming Food – Processing, Transportation, and Purchasing

FIELD TRIP:
Grocery Stores – Whole Foods Market and Dominick’s

BIOLOGY LAB 5 DUE:
HotHouse Planet

BIOLOGY LAB 6 ASSIGNED:
Questioning Consumption (due 12/5)

WRITING REFLECTION 2 ASSIGNED:
Analyzing the Commodification of Food (due 11/21)

11/16     TOPIC:
Case Study – Meat

              BIOLOGY READINGS:
Text Chapter 10 (feedlot agriculture) & 12
WW Paper 171 – Happier Meals

              BOOK QUIZ:
WW Paper 171 – Happier Meals

              LITERATURE READINGS:
Tony Hoagland – “Candelight”
Hungry Planet – “The Browns of Australia” (pp 23-29)
Eric Schlosser – Fast Food Nation (recommended)

              FILMS & DISCUSSION:
Journey to Planet Earth – Grasslands

Week 14
11/21     TOPIC:
Case Study – Meat

              BIOLOGY READINGS:
Text Chapter 10 (feedlot agriculture) & 12

              LITERATURE READINGS:
Ruth Ozeki – My Year of Meats
Michael Pollan – Hungry Planet:  “Food with a Face” (pp 162-163)

              BOOK QUIZ:
Ruth Ozeki – My Year of Meats

              AUTHOR BIOGRAPHY:
Ruth Ozeki

              FILMS & DISCUSSION:
Case Studies about Meat

              WRITING REFLECTION 2 DUE:
Analyzing the Commodification of Food

11/23     THANKSGIVING DAY – NO CLASS

WEEK 15
11/28     TOPIC:
Overpopulation or Overconsumption?

              BIOLOGY READINGS:
Text Chapters 5 (population ecology), 8, 22, & 23

              FILMS & DISCUSSION:
World Population
Case Studies in Population Growth and Resource Use

              WRITING REFLECTION 3 ASSIGNED:
Analyzing the Future of Food (due 12/7)

              SERVICE LEARNING:
Reflection Paper Due

11/30     TOPIC:
Sowing the Seeds of Hope – Rethinking Agricultural Production

              BIOLOGY READINGS:
Text Chapters 3 (review) & 23
WW Paper 148 – Nature’s Cornucopia (revisited)

              LITERATURE READINGS:
Aldo Leopold – “The Land Ethic”
Scott Russell Sanders – “Listening to the Prairie”

              GUEST LECTURERS:
Conservation Foundation (Dan Lobbes)
Green Earth Institute (Steve Tiwald)

              FILM & DISCUSSION:
Case Studies on Rethinking Agricultural Practices

              BIOLOGY QUIZ 5:
Text Chapters 5 (population ecology), 8, 10 (feedlot agriculture), 22, & 23

WEEK 16
12/5       TOPIC:
Sowing the Seeds of Hope – Rethinking Food Consumption

              BIOLOGY READINGS:
Text Chapters 3 (review) & 23

              LITERATURE READINGS:
Jane Smiley – Goodwill
Wendell Berry – “Rules for a Local Economy” (revisited)

              BOOK QUIZ:
Jane Smiley – Goodwill

              AUTHOR BIOGRAPHY:
Jane Smiley

              BIOLOGY LAB 6 DUE:
Questioning Consumption

12/7       TOPIC:
Sowing the Seeds of Hope – Rethinking Food Consumption

              BIOLOGY READINGS:
Text Chapters 3 (review) & 23
WW Paper 163 – Home Grown

              LITERATURE READINGS:
Gary Paul Nabhan – “Coming Home to Eat”
Michael Pollan – The Omnivore’s Dilemma: Chapter 9, “Big Organic” (pp 134-184)

               BOOK QUIZ:
WW Paper 171 – Home Grown

               FILM & DISCUSSION:
Case Studies on Rethinking Food Consumption

               WRITING REFLECTION 3 DUE:
Analyzing the Future of Food

Week 17
12/12      TOPIC:
The Magic of Food

               FOOD BIOGRAPHY PRESENTATIONS:
As assigned

12/14      TOPIC:
The Magic of Food

               FOOD BIOGRAPHY PRESENTATIONS:
As assigned

Week 18
12/19     RETURN WORK

              FILM: TBA

              FOOD BUFFET:
Bring a dish to share


FILMS SHOWN IN CLASS

SOIL:
Road to Rock Bottom
Save the Earth, Feed the World
 – Australia

SEED:
Deconstructing Supper
Risky Business
It Needs Political Decisions
 – Zimbabwe
Remnants of Eden – Thailand and Kenya

MAIZE:
Rigoberta Menchu: Broken Silence
Not for Sale

ENERGY & TOOLS:
Illinois Historic Panorama: Grasslands and Grangers
Only One Atmosphere
 – Computer Model
Hot Enough For You? – C3/C4 plants
More for Less – Brazil

PEST CONTROL:
Save the Earth, Feed the World
Land of Plenty, Land of Want
Nine Dragons in Vietnam

WATER:
Power of Water
Rivers of Destiny
Captured Rain
Waste Not, Want Not

RETHINKING FOOD PRODUCTION & CONSUMPTION:
Save the Earth, Feed the World – Organic Farming
Land of Plenty, Land of Want – Precision Farming
Frontline Stories – Coffee Country
Ecological Design – Local Food Production