Day

February 19, 2020

RINGING THE CHANGES? LITERARY AND CULTURAL RESPONSES TO THE ANTHROPOCENE

RINGING THE CHANGES? LITERARY AND CULTURAL RESPONSES TO THE ANTHROPOCENE

Special panel at the annual conference of the Association for German Studies in Great Britain and Northern Ireland, Swansea University, 2-4 September, 2020. 

Deadline: 3 April, 2020

The environmental challenge to our collective existence is both more urgent, and more intractable, than ever before. As ‘global heating’ looks likely to surpass 3C by the year 2100, the realities of life in the Anthropocene are asserting themselves with a speed and ferocity still inconceivable only a decade ...

Interrogating Folklore and the Literary Fairy-tale in the Anthropocene: Call for Chapter Proposals

Editors:

Anita Harris Satkunananthan, PhD. Sanghamitra Dalal, PhD. Selena Middleton, PhD.

Introduction

This collection of essays is aimed at exploring the role and relevance of folklore, fairytale and the various contemporary revisionings of folklore and fairytale in the age of the Anthropocene, when the changes in the landscape and geology due to human activity has irrevocably changed the trajectory of our collective destinies. This necessitates a shift in the transmission and generation of folklores both diasporic and settled, hybrid and indigenous. In the chaos of shifting geopolitical considerations, ...

Axes For the Frozen Sea: a Call For Fiction in Dark Mountain

‘Stories about climate change don’t need to be about climate change’, writes theatre critic Robert Butler in an essay published in 2014:

Stories written before people knew about human-made climate change – Faust, Galileo, King Lear – may now resonate in ways that hadn’t been seen before. Even if climate change is not the subject matter, or the principal theme, its presence may still be detectable. It could be, in Ian McEwan’s evocative phrase, ‘the background hum’.

A ‘background hum’ might resonate for ...

Eco-Georgic: From Antiquity to the Anthropocene

CFP: [email protected] 12.2 Autumn 2021 Eco-Georgic: From Antiquity to the Anthropocene

Guest Editors: Sue Edney (University of Bristol), Philipp Erchinger (University of Duesseldorf) and Pippa Marland (University of Leeds)

Georgic, a genre or mode of writing about agricultural labour and rural life, is typically concerned with ways of being at work in an environment that tends to overtake or resist all human efforts to master it. As David Fairer has argued, georgic nature is always, to some degree, out of tune with our human endeavours to ...